Wednesday, 10 February 2016

The pearl that broke its shell - Nadia Hashimi

In Kabul, 2007, with a drug-addicted father and no brothers, Rahima and her sisters can only sporadically attend school, and can rarely leave the house. Their only hope lies in the ancient custom of bacha posh, which allows young Rahima to dress and be treated as a boy until she is of marriageable age. As a son, she can attend school, go to the market, and chaperone her older sisters.

But Rahima is not the first in her family to adopt this unusual custom. A century earlier, her great-aunt, Shekiba, left orphaned by an epidemic, saved herself and built a new life the same way.

Crisscrossing in time, The Pearl the Broke Its Shell interweaves the tales of these two women separated by a century who share similar destinies. But what will happen once Rahima is of marriageable age? Will Shekiba always live as a man? And if Rahima cannot adapt to life as a bride, how will she survive? 

My thoughts:
This was such a good book, with powerful story in it. That last line made me smile and wanting to shed a tear for the happiness of it.

A girl is always in the wrong. Ugh, that made me angry. Rahima and her sisters could not walk to school cos if boys followed them then everyone would think it was cos they wanted that. And all Rahima wanted was to learn. But this was not the country for that. Still, she got the chance thanks to a custom, that is actually real. They dress the girl as a boy and she is a boy. 

But this is still Afghanistan, and a village in the middle of nowhere. I knew nothing good would come of that. I am not going to spoil the story, but she will leave a rough life. One that makes me angry at men, sorry men, but some men are just!!!!! There is this one line about a couple of men talking about women and how the new Afghanistan will have women in parliament and they are all, but who will take care of the children? *headdesk*

I am going to go on a rant about men and religion and history soon so let's move away from that....*backing away*

The book is also about the story of Shekiba, Rahima's great great grandmother. Who also dressed as a boy and was a boy and how Rahima wants to find her own destiny like Shekiba. I liked the early parts there, at the end her story was not as good as in the beginning. But it was interesting to see how she lived in a time where Afghanistan changed to be later changed back again. How they thought a new era was coming with modern things and free women. But hey, then it became bad again. I hope Shekiba did not see that.

Conclusion:
I want to say so many clever things, but...just read it. An interesting take on how it is to be a young woman in a country where women are not important.

Cover 
Nice, but hmmm

Hardcover, 464 pages
Published May 6th 2014 by William Morrow
Fiction
Library


46 comments:

  1. I have to be in the mood for these kinds of reads but I have put it on my library list. I have a feeling I would get angry while reading. I forget how much freedom as a woman I have compared to others.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can not not be angry when reading this. So def read it

      Delete
  2. I tried to talk my book club into reading this but no one was interested. I guess I'll have to read it on my own.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I really loved this one as well, so many things, many difficult ones

    ReplyDelete
  4. Great to hear it was a powerful story

    ReplyDelete
  5. That's so hard to read or watch sometimes. I can't imagine what it's like to live it.

    Karen @For What It's Worth

    ReplyDelete
  6. This sounds like an informative and powerful read if not frustrating when you see how women are treated.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It does make me think men are so arghhhhh

      Delete
  7. Looks like my library has this :) These types of books are always so sad though. And makes you so angry at men too.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Glad to see you enjoyed it, this would be a tough read for me since I'd get angry at how men treat her as well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Women are cattle to some there. Horrible

      Delete
  9. What is so sad is that this exact attitude happens in the US way too often... and it looks like several are trying to take women backward as well. Yea, this one would totally get my hackles up.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I agree the cover could be much better for this, not very eye catching but I love that the story was so emotional and touching. I will definitely keep this in mind now so thanks for the recommendation!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I mostly thought about the fact that I have no idea who those people are...since she dressed as a boy

      Delete
  11. This really sounds like an amazing book. I'll have to look for it.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Wow this sounds like a book really worth reading although I can see how it would make you - or any reader- really angry at the treatment of women.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Wow, this sounds emotional and fantastic. What a custom! You darling book buddy, thanks for the intro to this one. :)

    ReplyDelete
  14. I know how you feel. Injustice like that infuriates me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wish the world could change, but nope

      Delete
  15. oh I would read this one!! Sounds unique. Great review.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I have this book and I have heard many positive things about it. I don't know why, but every time I pick it up to read, I just feel very meh about it. Clearly, I should just shake that off and do it.

    And yay for reading diversely :-) Maybe your library is making strides!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can not like them all.

      I am sure my library has many, it's just, to find them! So many books

      Delete
  17. Oh boy - this seems like it would be sad.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I find that men are more oppressive in a country whose foundation of believe is based in religion. So it doesn't surprise me to learn about such a custom just so the girls can get education for themselves. This one is a definite must read for me.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Sounds like a great story. Powerful like you said.

    ReplyDelete
  20. I really want to read this! I loved the Underground Girls of Kabul which was about this practice

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I really do not get it, I'd get it here, but there

      Delete

Contributors

Copyright © 2008-2016 Book Girl of Mur-y-Castell All Rights Reserved. Proudly powered by Blogger

  © Blogger template Starry by Ourblogtemplates.com 2008 Modified by Lea

Back to TOP